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PostPosted: Tue, 05-01-16, 10:35 GMT 
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EDIT: The full resolution reflectance can be grabbed here!

Greetings!

I come here to offer a new resource to the CM community; a global, no-shadow map of the Moon!
This map was processed from 110,000 WAC images, the methods of which are elaborated here.
At first, I could not find the data, but a check on the WMS server produced a full-res copy, good for a level 7 VT.
I figured I could offer a reduced resolution version (32k) as a straight download for convenience, to see if others would like the full-resolution copy.
Anyone willing to colorize the data, feel free to try!

What the map looks like:
Image

32768x16384 TIF download
Get the 32k PNG VT here!

With the LOLA normal map:

Image
Image
Image
Image

HOW TO INSTALL THE VT WITH LOLA NORMAL MAP:

Copy the contents to \extras\LOLA_March2011release\textures\hires\MoonTopo_LOLA

Many thanks to the F-tex tools for doing a stellar job!


Credit:

NASA/GSFC/Arizona State University provided data accessed via Lunaserv WMS


References:

Boyd, A.K. et. al., 2013, LROC WAC 100 Meter Scale Photometrically
Normalized Map of the Moon, AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts
Estes, N.M. et. al., 2013, Lunaserv Web Map Service: History,
Implementation Details, Development, and Uses, 44th Lunar and Planetary
Science Conference, pg. 2609.
Robinson, M.S., Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Experimental Data
Record, LRO-L-LROC-2-EDR-V1.0, NASA Planetary Data System, 2010
Robinson, M.S. et. al., 2010, Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera (LROC)
Instrument Overview, Space Science Reviews, Vol 150, pp. 81-124


Last edited by postmuch on Fri, 08-01-16, 16:06 GMT, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue, 05-01-16, 22:24 GMT 
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Quote:
Anyone willing to colorize the data, feel free to try!


That's kind of easy. See e.g. my My favorite Moon texture: Chang'e 2 remapped, colored, ..16k
from March 2014:
viewtopic.php?f=6&t=428
Don't miss the Moon views(towards the end) that I showed there from only a 16k texture, but being hand-remapped...

Thanks postmuch for putting up here a medley of hires views from that LRO WAC texture of the Moon.

Fridger

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PostPosted: Thu, 07-01-16, 23:04 GMT 
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Shouldn't colorization be done by combining the relevant bands from WAC?
See for example my post on WAC color photometry: viewtopic.php?p=13428#p13428

Yes, the WAC bands do not map precisely to any of the CIE rgb primaries but simply colorizing a single band by applying a gradient is also another approximation, and it's not clear if it's a better one.
Different bands exhibit different reflectivity as I explain in my linked post. Moreover as Sato et al showed, the reflectivity per band is highly variable even across the entire surface of the Moon. This probably corresponds to varying spatial distributions of minerals, grain sizes, etc. Thus an accurate color map can only be made by the kind of localized photometric normalization employed, per band as Sato et al did.


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PostPosted: Fri, 08-01-16, 9:27 GMT 
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dirkpitt wrote:
Shouldn't colorization be done by combining the relevant bands from WAC?
See for example my post on WAC color photometry: viewtopic.php?p=13428#p13428

Well, in your quoted thread I have already expressed my reservations against the Hapke approach that you have presented there. To my eye, the results are closer to some "enhanced color" profile variant than to "visual" or "natural" color. We have amply discussed this point. I have certainly nothing against replacing the older UVVIS 5 band color basis by the color bands from the WAC color photometry in my kind of approach. Provided of course that the WAC photometry is filtered to represent natural color.

The coloration technique I described for the Chang'e 2 moon texture and actually for many of my textures does employ a reference map into Natural color, i.e. the UVVIS 5 band color basis from the Clementine mission.: viewtopic.php?f=6&t=428
Quote:
Yes, the WAC bands do not map precisely to any of the CIE rgb primaries but simply colorizing a single band by applying a gradient is also another approximation, and it's not clear if it's a better one.

As I wrote, I have compared the results of my standard coloration method with MANY color photos of the Moon and with my visual impression through my telescope that is --by construction-- free of residual color imperfections.
Quote:

Different bands exhibit different reflectivity as I explain in my linked post. Moreover as Sato et al showed, the reflectivity per band is highly variable even across the entire surface of the Moon. This probably corresponds to varying spatial distributions of minerals, grain sizes, etc. Thus an accurate color map can only be made by the kind of localized photometric normalization employed, per band as Sato et al did.

All this the human eye cannot distinguish. For certain more specialized purposes, the Hapke method may certainly be preferable.

Fridger

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PostPosted: Fri, 08-01-16, 13:44 GMT 
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I'm not suggesting that the WAC band wavelengths are "better" than Clementine's. Also, I've already stated earlier in my Hapke post that indeed the Hapke color mosaic as presented does not look entirely natural and that combining different bands should produce a more natural result.

Anyway, Boyd has stated that his empirical reflectance normalization is very close to Sato's result that used Hapke parameters instead. This is not surprising as Boyd was a co-author on Sato's paper and Hapke was co-author for both!
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.P13B3816B

Coloring any single band image (here, 643 nm) is going to be hard to quantitatively justify. I like the results in your Chang'e 2 map, but as a method I would say that it probably has more artistic than scientific merit.

More on topic, regarding Boyd's WAC empirically normalized reflectance mosaic, I have not been able to find .IMG or .TIF files covering all lunar latitudes on WMS, only files for 30S - 30N. Yet clearly such files exist as the generated renderings show. What's the file path?


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PostPosted: Fri, 08-01-16, 15:02 GMT 
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Quote:
Coloring any single band image (here, 643 nm) is going to be hard to quantitatively justify.

Absolutely. The starting texture should be a grayscale limit that is invariant wrto rotations in color space! E.g.
Code:
 gray = sqrt(r*r + g*g + b*b)

I am sorry, I had overlooked the single wavelength in the thread by postmuch.
Quote:
I like the results in your Chang'e 2 map, but as a method I would say that it probably has more artistic than scientific merit.

;-)
It is a proven AND reproducable (hence scientific ;-)) approach that is specially suited for our demands of generating approximately visual color textures with limited spectrometric data, It is e.g. NOT suited for specific scientific purposes, like identifying minerals etc by specific colors on a planet or moon.

The typical checks one can do are these: take a colored texture that is stated officially to represent natural color. Perform the grayscale limit in GIMP. Then reconstruct the colored image via the GIMP coloration module that I always use with a natural color template. Compare the result with the original.

Fridger

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PostPosted: Fri, 08-01-16, 16:04 GMT 
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dirkpitt wrote:
I'm not suggesting that the WAC band wavelengths are "better" than Clementine's. Also, I've already stated earlier in my Hapke post that indeed the Hapke color mosaic as presented does not look entirely natural and that combining different bands should produce a more natural result.

Anyway, Boyd has stated that his empirical reflectance normalization is very close to Sato's result that used Hapke parameters instead. This is not surprising as Boyd was a co-author on Sato's paper and Hapke was co-author for both!
http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014AGUFM.P13B3816B

Coloring any single band image (here, 643 nm) is going to be hard to quantitatively justify. I like the results in your Chang'e 2 map, but as a method I would say that it probably has more artistic than scientific merit.

More on topic, regarding Boyd's WAC empirically normalized reflectance mosaic, I have not been able to find .IMG or .TIF files covering all lunar latitudes on WMS, only files for 30S - 30N. Yet clearly such files exist as the generated renderings show. What's the file path?


First, for the Hapke bands - this is a map using the 643, 566, and 415nm bands, with the poles GIMP-colorized using gradients derived from those bands:

Image

A more natural result, but not quite close to expected (?) color spectrum. So, I took the old Clementine Moon textures (SethEden) for the Orbiter beta and colorized the reflectance to more closely match Fridger's map:

Image
Image
Image

Compare with Fridger's map:

Image

The SethEden map still shows alignment issues, most notably at the poles, but I doubt most people would recognize the alignment errors in this context unless you pointed them out :).
Though, there are very small gaps in the coloring, but they can be easily fixed :).


Second, since there's not much traffic here, I feel safe to post the full-resolution reflectance (POST UPDATED):

Grab it here!


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PostPosted: Fri, 08-01-16, 18:32 GMT 
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Yeah! Well done.

Probably the true Natural coloration would be the mean of your and my colors ;-)

Fridger

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PostPosted: Sat, 09-01-16, 6:09 GMT 
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postmuch,

just in case you don't know:
really big-size images (like e.g. 1920x1200) are best uploaded from your computer with the "upload attachment" tool below the post editing area.

In edit mode:
1) browse and select an image filename locally,
2) click "Add the file",
3) place the cursor to the desired position within your post and hit "place inline"

To visualize the kingsize image, users click first on the (attached) image and then hit the browser fullscreen shortcut (F11 for Firefox).

The great advantage of this method is that the textwidth of your post will stay at its convenient default size and thus horizontal scrolling is avoided when people are reading messages...

Fridger

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PostPosted: Wed, 13-01-16, 8:00 GMT 
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the PDS *.img files are here
http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/data/LRO-L-LRO ... ORMALIZED/

and a 3 band set of tif's

and the September 2015 WAC dem
http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/data/LRO-L-LRO ... AC_GLD100/

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PostPosted: Thu, 14-01-16, 16:13 GMT 
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I don't believe those were the files dirkpitt was referring to. To quote a response I got from the LROC webmaster:

Quote:
The WAC Normalized Reflectance hosted on the WMS server is derived using
a different algorithm than the Empirically Normalized Reflectance
product available via our RDR Product page. The polar data values for
the WMS hosted reflectance product should [sic] be used for any "critical
science" interpretations, since solution at the poles can generate
erroneous values. The resolution (100 meter per pixel) is possible since
it is a single band of WAC data.


I couldn't find the .img or .tif files he was referring to either, and was left scratching my head as to why they didn't bother to put it on the RDR page.
Thus, I had to engineer WMS web queries to get the full-res data, albeit not georeferenced in any way, though that can easily be fixed with listgeo+geotifcp
and hand-edited geotiff metadata.


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PostPosted: Tue, 02-02-16, 5:55 GMT 
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I did some playing around with some of these. To begin with, I downloaded 64 pixel tif files from here.
I got the 643, 566, and 415 files. The problem was there was no coverage above 60 or below -60 as you all know. This is what I got from combining the 3 bands.

Attachment:
small-moon.jpg
small-moon.jpg [ 249.82 KiB | Viewed 1960 times ]


I then tried the 643 global mosaic from the same site as above and used the image above to color it with the gimp. It looks a bit dark and there is a lot of crater shadows. Color doesn't look right either.

Attachment:
small-full-moon.jpg
small-full-moon.jpg [ 444.33 KiB | Viewed 1960 times ]


Anyhow, postmuch, I downloaded your 32k texture and used that as a base for the other 2 bands. It is a bit off the 643 band I downloaded from the WAC Empirically Normalized mosaic site , a different shade from the band 643 images as you can see here.

Attachment:
test.jpg
test.jpg [ 364.49 KiB | Viewed 1960 times ]


But I used that as a base for the other 2 bands and because of the color difference above, it came out a little too green. So then I colorized it with the gimp and it came out like this.

Attachment:
small-full-moon-2.jpg
small-full-moon-2.jpg [ 380.72 KiB | Viewed 1960 times ]


The boundary between the 2 can be seen but.......

Some day I'll try to do all 3 bands mentioned with just calibrated data. My big question is, How did you process the 643 image? Are you part of the team at ASU? I would like to try and process all 3 bands the way you did the 643.
cartrite


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PostPosted: Tue, 02-02-16, 6:59 GMT 
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for very little "shading" at the poles use the "summer" views

North Summer
http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/data/LRO-L-LRO ... TH_SUMMER/
South Summer
http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/data/LRO-L-LRO ... TH_SUMMER/

screenshot of the north
Image

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PostPosted: Tue, 02-02-16, 9:14 GMT 
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cartrite wrote:
Some day I'll try to do all 3 bands mentioned with just calibrated data. My big question is, How did you process the 643 image? Are you part of the team at ASU? I would like to try and process all 3 bands the way you did the 643.
cartrite


Sorry to disappoint, but I merely engineered WMS web queries to scrape the Boyd/Robinson map from the server. More a lucky find than anything, but I'm still puzzled as to why they didn't publish this map on the RDR page :?.


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PostPosted: Tue, 02-02-16, 12:09 GMT 
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Nice, that's one of the great things of using an open standard (like WMS)!


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